wrench monkey

They Don’t Make That Anymore

My eyes glance over the tell tale words on the site, “Product out of stock.” My first impulse is to ask, “Why?” I know the answer, it’s always the same, “They don’t make that anymore.”

And why should they? They don’t make the bike anymore, why make parts for it?

I have learned, “they don’t make that anymore,” is a common refrain among despondent bike builders. Neophytes like myself have neither the skill or imagination to build a new part, and 3D printing parts is still a ways away from replicating solid options. There is a tremendous feeling of helplessness when one learns that simply replacing a part is not as easy as ordering a new one.

The latest example of this was my carb harness. I rebuilt the carbs a while ago, finding it difficult, and making it more so by pulling the carbs from the bracket that holds them together, something I later learned is unnecessary. I think I had some vague notion of painting them black, but changed my mind. So when I went to bench set them I was quite shocked to find a major problem.

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At some point, between the time I took them apart and put them back together, or maybe even before the aluminum bracket cracked on the right side. After checking Ebay for a used one, it seemed like this was a common occurrence.  Sadly, “they don’t make that anymore.” So the options were, search for someone with a not yet cracked one, buy an expensive new set of carbs, or get it fixed.

I choose the later. Fortunately, there are people in this world with more skill and talent at metal work than I, and I was able to have one of those people weld the bracket back together. After a bit of grinding the carbs were good to go and ready to be tuned and put back on the engine.

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This isn’t the only time I’ve run into this problem while rebuilding TIM. Some instances, like the carbs, are probably due to age, or an aggressive hand in pulling the bike apart, others are just sort of mind boggling. For instance, the brake pivot that was installed on TIM when I got the bike was too small for the bracket on the frame. It was only by a few millimeters, and could be made functional, but not really safe. (No one really wants to ride around with the constant fear of their brake pedal falling off the pivot while traveling on the highway. )

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The reason the brake pivot didn’t fit is likely because the frame is and F model and the pivot was off a K model. The two bikes use the same L bracket style brake pivot, except they are of just slightly different lengths. So whoever put the bike together before I at least twice replaced a part with an almost identical, yet slightly different sized part. (The other time I’m aware of was the front fork, where the top and bottom of the triple tree were from different model bikes.)

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Fortunately I was able to find a correct sized brake pivot for the bike, but it took time and a bunch of work. But that’s what I find fun about building a bike, solving a problem in a creative manner with what you’ve got, because “they don’t make that anymore.” And I’m sure whoever takes over ownership of TIM after me will shake their head and wonder why I did some of the things I did. After all, the bars I put on are off a 350.

Tanks For the Memories

It has been a while since I’ve really had the time to go into the shop to put any meaningful work in on TIM. So yesterday I decided to take the morning off writing, instead of sitting around waiting for the muses I thought I might get a chance to finally clear coat the gas tank.

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This gas tank has been a thorn in my side for almost the entirety of the project. Among the litany of abuses the previous owners inflicted upon TIM, one of the worst has got to have been the gas tank. The knee dents they put in it were atrocious and unequal in size, forcing both them and me to use a massive amount of bondo, just to make it look okay.

However, despite the massive amount of time it took me to finish the body work and get the tank painted, it has generally turned out okay. In the rare chances I’ve had to get to the shop I’ve been able to put on several coats of paint and every thing looked pretty good, or so I thought until I walked in and saw this.

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The gas tank lock flap had started flaking, bad. Even just touching it caused it to flake worse than in the above picture. The only option? Sand it down to bare metal and redo the whole thing.

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Someone, I don’t know who, thought it was a good idea to drill a bunch of holes in the flap, and then fill them back in. Apparently, this mystery person thought speed holes in a piece of metal meant to prevent water or thieves from getting into the gas tank was a good idea. Probably the same person who drilled all the other speed holes.

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With a little help from Dave, the bondo didn’t come out looking like a birthday cake. I managed to get it all sanded and primed, but forgot to take a picture. I’m hoping it will only require one last paint day and then I can final finish it up with a clear and be done with body work for a while.

I forgot to take a picture of the primed flap, but here’s a picture of a sick Yamaha xs650, Dave is building for a customer.

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Stay tuned for the next installment of the ongoing adventures of TIM’s resurrection: They Don’t Make that Anymore.

Beat on the Brat Style!

Beat on the brat

Beat on the brat

Beat on the brat with a baseball bat

Oh yeah, oh yeah, uh-oh.”

(Ramones)

TIM initially went into the shop because of electrical problems, but it soon became clear that there were more problems than just bad wiring. Among the numerous and seemingly insurmountable issues there was one that stood out as painfully clear even before TIM went under the knife; the uncomfortable riding position.

I’ve had several bikes in my life and ridden many I didn’t own, and one thing I’ve learned is that a comfortable riding position is the key to enjoying a bike. Nothing ruins a ride more than an uncomfortable position. A bike can be a ratty, rusted POS that continuously breaks down, and still be great fun to ride, but if it’s uncomfortable for its rider it will sit and gather dust even on the nicest of days.

Whoever decided on the set up for TIM was either thinking more about aesthetics or had the sadistic inclinations of the Marquis de Sade. For one thing, the drag bars were the story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears in reverse, neither high enough nor low enough, but right in the middle ground where they were guaranteed to cause discomfort. The solo seat was alright, but a little too wide and without any meaningful padding. And who ever had owned it before had failed to put rear sets on TIM, forcing me to bend double over the tank, with my feet in front of me, a position guaranteed to cause cramping within fifteen minutes and back pain that lasted for days afterwards.

My initial desire was to throw on a pair of clip-ons, or classic clubman style bars, and rear sets, but my lovely girlfriend quickly put the kibosh on this idea with the innocent question, ” When can I ride on the back?”

That was that, the solo seat had to go along with the drag bars and the non existent rear sets. It took me a while of hemming and hawing before I decided upon a solution. Brat style.

The term brat style refers to two things. The first is the amazing Japanese custom motorcycle shop named Brat Style. I first learned about this shop and their bikes while I was teaching English in Japan. Unfortunately, due to uncontrollable circumstances, namely the Enron style downfall of my employer, I was prevented from visiting the shop in Tokyo, but I was able to see at least one of their bikes on the road and was pretty impressed.

http://www.bratstyle.com

The second and more common use of the term brat style, is a custom bike setup somewhere between traditional British cafe racer and an American style bobber. Typical features include but aren’t limited to: An empty center triangle and removal of as much weight and unnecessary material as possible, a shortened suspension, non drop bars, a frame with an up turned hoop end, and a seat that is relatively long and flat.

Example of a Brat Style bike produced by the shop Brat Style.

Example of a brat style bike produced by the shop Brat Style.

While there have been bikes like this around for a long time, brat style has recently been gaining in popularity in the custom motorcycle scene and a Google search will turn up hundreds of examples. This is probably because it is relatively simple and inexpensive, allows for a great deal of flexibility in customization and also provides a more comfortable riding position as well as the option of riding around with a someone on the back.

TIM with a Bratty hoop and all painted up.

TIM with his new bratty hoop all painted up.

Sadly, because of computer and camera issues there are few pictures of TIM being stripped and cut up. This namely took the form of cleaning off the meatball welds the original builder had done and adding a new up turned hoop end..  Some of the recent pictures show the remarkable transformation that is still under way.

TIM has been slowly changing from ratty cafe racer to brat style super star. Ignore the beat up tank and instead focus on the Honda CB350 style bars, and the beginnings of the brat style two up seat. It’s hard to believe these are pictures of the same bike.

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“With a brat like that always on your back, what can you do? Lose?” (Ramones)